Understanding Hypermobility Foot Mechanics and Pain Management

I always start at the feet.

The foot needs to be stable and mobile at the same time for good foot mechanics. It is super important to understand the relationship between the foot and the rest of the body. The foot will impact the knee, hip, lower back, and upwards from there. Even asymptomatic hypermobile feet and ankles can contribute to pain all the way up the body (1).

What’s tissue tolerance? Can it help me avoid injury with hypermobility?

Injury prevention – how do we work towards that with hypermobility?

Should I Squeeze my Glutes when I exercise with hypermobility?

Squeezing, pushing, pulling – all words I try to avoid when teaching my hypermobile clients. Why – because they tend to put more tension into the body rather than helping someone move with ease and less pain.

What really happens when we lock our joints?

What happens when we lock our Hypermobile Joints? As someone who always stood with locked knees and picked things up with hyperextended elbows, changing this pattern was really important for my joint health.

What people don’t see when you live with a chronic illness

What’s it like when you go out out – if you do go out out? Is there a lot of preparation and organisation involved? I have friends who don’t have EDS or chronic illness. They fill their weekends with activities from morning till night – doing multiple things in one day. And they don’t seem that tired.

The Impact of Hypermobile Knees

Hyperextension of the knees in hypermobility is common. I used the adopt the strangest of standing postures from simple knee locking to crossing one leg over the other or actually wrapping one leg around the other one.